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Clementine Rum Marmalade

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Clementines are one my favorite winter fruits. No, they aren’t at all local to my Montana home, they are however; sweet and generally a fairly frugal indulgence. In an effort to try and preserve some for later, I wanted to some kind of spread with them. Clementine Rum Marmalade is a deliciously sweet spread with just a hint of bitterness and rum perfect for toast and cake.

Make the most of those sweet, winter seasonal fruits by preserving some with this easy and delicious Clementine Rum Marmalade. Great on toast and dessert, there's no end to the ways to use this preserve.

Natural Pectin

The peels and pulp of most citrus fruit is loaded with natural pectin. Traditional marmalade always takes advantage of this natural pectin for gelling. No need to add commercial pectin for a wonderful set to this marmalade. Getting that natural pectin out of the pith and peel requires a good bit of cooking time – don’t short cut this.

Slightly Bitter

Because the peel including the pith is left in the jam, there is a slightly bitter flavor left in the marmalade. It is not as intensely bitter as traditional orange marmalade, however. The pith of clementines is smaller and sweeter meaning there is some bitterness but not overwhelmingly so. There’s a good bit of added sugar as well.

Make the most of those sweet, winter seasonal fruits by preserving some with this easy and delicious Clementine Rum Marmalade. Great on toast and dessert, there's no end to the ways to use this preserve.

Amazing Texture

Because the peel is left in the marmalade, the resulting texture is pretty special. There is a combination of thick, almost creamy jam with soft, spongy peel that is equally good spread on toast or poured over ice cream. Spread it between cake layers, too.

Yield: 6 Half Pints

Clementine Rum Marmalade

Make the most of those sweet, winter seasonal fruits by preserving some with this easy and delicious Clementine Rum Marmalade. Great on toast and dessert, there's no end to the ways to use this preserve.

Make the most of those sweet, winter seasonal fruits by preserving some with this easy and delicious Clementine Rum Marmalade. Great on toast and dessert, there's no end to the ways to use this preserve.

Ingredients

  • 1 ½ Pounds of Clementines, well scrubbed
  • 2 Tablespoons Lemon Juice
  • 6 ½ Cups Hot Water
  • 5 ½ Cups Granulated Sugar
  • ¼ Cup Rum

Instructions

  1. Place a dampened cheesecloth on the inside of strainer on top of bowl. Cut the clementines in half cross-wise. Squeeze juice into the cheesecloth. When finished squeezing juice, pull the pulp off the rind and place on the cheesecloth. Tie the edges of the cheesecloth, making a large spice bag. Place the juice from the bowl, lemon juice, and bag of pulp in a jam pot.
  2. Cut the peel into thin strips and place all of that into the jam pot with the hot water. Bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat but keep boiling, stirring occasionally until reduced by half and peel is tender. This takes about 1 hour and 15 minutes. Remove from heat.
  3. Place the cheesecloth bag into a wire mesh strainer and press with a spoon to squeeze out juice. Measure out 4 1/2 Cups of juice, peel mixture. Put that in a pot with 5 1/2 cups sugar. Boil until gel stage is reached - this took me about 20 minutes. Add the rum and boil for another two minutes.
  4. Pour into jars. Process in a water bath for 15 minutes (adjusting for altitude).

Did you make this recipe?

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Lisa from Iroquois

Sunday 20th of January 2019

question: Your instructions say Measure out 4 1/2 Cups of juice, peel mixture .... I am taking that to mean ... 4 1/2 cups of liquid from the pot plus all of the peel mixture. As opposed to scooping out liquid with peels in it, making the quantity of peel variable.

Kathie Lapcevic

Monday 21st of January 2019

You could do either - I generally just scoop. This way you can control how much peel. There isn't likely to be a whole bunch leftover.

Billy

Tuesday 13th of November 2018

This looks oh so delicious! I've never made clementine marmalade with rum included but now I am scratching my head wondering why! Can't wait to try this at home.

Adrienne O

Saturday 14th of January 2017

I am making this now with half clementines, and half Cara Cara oranges ... so far it looks amazing! Thanks for the recipe!

Homespun Seasonal Living

Sunday 15th of January 2017

That sounds amazing!

Kaz doyle

Friday 6th of January 2017

I am from UK and we make our marmalade from Seville oranges but have to wait until end of january to buy them and then we have to be quick as they all go within a week or so. I look forward to trying your recipe as it could be made all year round. Very happy to have found you through facebook. Thanks.

Vanessa Cato

Sunday 20th of January 2019

Being from the UK, I have really missed those lovely bitter Seville oranges in the seven years I've been living in Utah. I like my orange marmalade chunky, and it is easier than all that grating! I also use a pressure cooker. I will certainly try this recipe, though.

One thing that intrigues me is why Americans feel the need to 'can' their jams and jellies. I've been making them since I was a kid, and never canned them, and they last really well in a cool pantry.

Homespun Seasonal Living

Friday 6th of January 2017

Thanks so much for saying hello! I've had marmalade made from Seville oranges and that is a beautiful thing. Happy marmalade making!

Janet

Saturday 31st of December 2016

I made this and it taste fabulous, Touch bitter with tangerine rinds but great flavors. I did add 2 drops yellow and red food coloring to enhance the color a touch. TY

Homespun Seasonal Living

Saturday 31st of December 2016

Thank so much for letting me know about your results! Traditionally marmalades are always a touch bitter because of the rind and I was trying to keep it somewhat traditional. Enjoy!

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