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Honeysuckle Tea

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Make fresh honeysuckle tea for a refreshing and cooling drink this summer season!

This is a simple summer tea that takes advantage of those copious honeysuckle blossoms for a flavorful herbal drink.

A teacup full of honeysuckle tea with orange blossoms floating on top, sitting on a saucer, fresh honeysuckle blossoms sitting to the right of the saucer, and a teapot behind. A white text block at the bottom stating: how to make honeysuckle tea.

How to Harvest Honeysuckle

Simply cut the blossoms from the vine making sure to not cut off the end of the blossom. Try to keep the sweet nectar of the honeysuckle inside the flower.

No need for stems or leaves, just the blossoms.

A Quick Rinse

Give the blossoms a quick rinse under cool running water and then spin in a salad spinner or blot dry quickly.

We want to remove any dirt, pollen from other plants, and bugs from the flowers. Again, we don’t want to soak so much that we lose the nectar from inside the flower. A quick rinse should do.

Honeysuckle Tea Benefits

Besides being tasty, honeysuckle has some wonderful benefits for our body as well.

A teacup full of honeysuckle tea with orange blossoms floating on top, sitting on a saucer, fresh honeysuckle blossoms sitting to the right of the saucer, and a teapot behind.

Honeysuckle is considered a very cooling plant and is often used to treat things like hot flashes, fever, and sunstroke. This cooling effect makes it ideal for summer refreshments on the hottest days.

Honeysuckle is also often used to treat sore throats and inflammation in the respiratory tracts. Have a cup of the tea after taking some honeysuckle glyercite to help soothe that sore throat.

Which Type of Honeysuckle?

There are multiple types of honeysuckle grown all over the world, use whatever honeysuckle is available to you.

Please note: As always be sure of identification before ingesting.

Orange honeysuckle blossoms in bloom on vines full of leaves in the forest.

In Montana, we have a native orange honeysuckle that grows on a vine but plenty of folks plant the Japanese Honeysuckle for landscaping purposes. Use what you have.

How to Dry Honeysuckle Flowers

Want to make honeysuckle tea in the winter? Dehydrate the flowers in season to use later.

Simply place the flowers onto wire trays and let sit out of direct sunlight until dry and brittle. This will likely take a few days, depending on humidity and warmth.

Once dry, place into airtight containers and store in a cool, dry place.

Use 1 Tablespoon of dried honeysuckle flowers to 8 ounces of boiling water for tea.

How to Make Honeysuckle Tea

You’ll need 2 cups of fresh blossoms for every 4 cups of tea. Honey or other sweetener is completely optional.

Bring water to a boil and let sit for just two minutes so that it’s not a rolling boil and pour 4 cups of the water over the 2 cups of blossoms.

Let steep for 10 minutes and strain the blossoms from the water. Sweeten, if desired.

A glass full of honeysuckle tea over ice sitting on a board surrounded by orange honeysuckle blossoms.

Enjoy warm or refrigerate and drink over ice.

Do store any unused tea in the refrigerator for up to 3 days.

Want to up your iced tea game? Get my Guide to Iced Tea to help get creative and stay refreshed!

Yield: 4 Cups

Honeysuckle Tea

A teacup sitting on a saucer full of honeysuckle tea with orange honeysuckle blossoms floating inside, fresh honeysuckle blossoms sitting to the right of the saucer, and a teapot behind.

Cooling and refreshing honeysuckle tea is a delicious summertime drink.

Prep Time 15 minutes
Steep Time 10 minutes
Total Time 25 minutes

Ingredients

  • 4 Cups Boiling Water
  • 2 Cups Fresh Honeysuckle Blossoms
  • Honey to taste, optional

Instructions

  1. Put the honeysuckle blossoms into a heat proof cup.
  2. Remove the boiling water from the stove and let sit 2 minutes so that it's no longer in a rolling boil.
  3. Pour the almost boiling water over the honeysuckle blossoms.
  4. Let steep 10 minutes.
  5. Strain the blossoms from the water.
  6. Enjoy warm or refrigerate and drink cold.

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Nutrition Information:

Yield:

4

Serving Size:

1 cup

Amount Per Serving: Calories: 16Total Fat: 0gSaturated Fat: 0gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 0gCholesterol: 0mgSodium: 10mgCarbohydrates: 4gFiber: 0gSugar: 4gProtein: 0g

We try our best but cannot guarantee that nutrition information is 100% accurate.

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